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Black Series Review | The Mandalorian Beskar Armor (The Mandalorian)

Phil hunts down the Beskar Armored Mando but suffers a frustrating experience!

After a few delays, Hasbro’s new range of Black Series figures are finally making it to market, and standing out among the crowd is the new Beskar Armor Mando from The Mandalorian. This figure is high on every fans’ wishlist and we can only hope it has been worth the wait.

First off, let’s address the elephant in the room. This figure DOES NOT come with a removable helmet. It’s a major disappointment. This feature would have tipped this figure over the edge into pure awesomeness, but sadly we’re going to have to live without a Pedro Pascal variant for a little while longer. Aside from that major detraction, this figure is pretty damn cool. Mostly. I say that because there are fundamental flaws with the finished product which all relate to the same thing – the jetpack. More on that later, let’s get down to the crux of the figure.

Beginning with the sculpt, and it’s awesome. The Beskar Armor is finished gloriously and boasts the metallic finish one would expect from such gorgeous Mando armor. For the most part, the figure appears to be a repaint of the original figure (read our review) except for the new signet shoulder pad, the chest plate, and the wrist gauntlets. The figure has 22 points of articulation and comes complete with the Amban Phase-Pulse Blaster Rifle, jetpack, and his trusty blaster pistol.

The armor is wonderfully recreated and is aesthetically screen accurate, even down to the fantastic Mudhorn Signet embossed on the shoulder pad. The Beskar leg plates even come with some minimal weathering which only adds to the authenticity of the design.  The cape has been lovingly recreated in a leather-look plastic that hangs gloriously from his shoulder and delivers an aesthetically pleasing finish. But it’s here where the problems begin.

Annoyingly, the jetpack CANNOT be attached to the figure with the cape on. The jetpack attaches to the spine of the figure via a series of cut-out holes – and the positioning of the cape restricts you from attaching it. What’s worse is that you can’t reposition the cape, then attach the jetpack and return the cape to its original position. The girth of the jetpack prevents it – so, you’re forced to remove the cape when you want to use the jetpack.  I am not the biggest fan of soft goods “cotton” capes, but the inclusion of one would have suited this figure better than plastic.

It’s a schoolboy error from Hasbro and demonstrates the major drawback in reusing/repainting pre-manufactured figures. This figure was clearly not designed to employ a jetpack, and Hasbro has tried to cut costs by rehashing a figure not fit for purpose. Collectors will find themselves frustrated by this fundamental flaw, especially those who pride themselves on screen accurate dioramas. The S.H. Figuarts version of this figure COMES WITH a cotton cape and as a result, the finished product is far superior to Hasbro’s underwhelming attempt. This is such a shame, because if not for this oversight – the figure would be one of the best releases of the year so far.

Check out our image gallery below:

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Verdict:

I adore the look of this figure. It is breathtaking to look at and looks fabulous alongside IG-11, Baby Yoda, and Cara Dune. However, the fundamental flaws in the design leave the finished product a case of style over substance. This unwelcome rehash of original figures is a troubling trend and highlights the weak points in Hasbro’s release schedule. I am all for cutting costs to produce a figure to meet demand, but this corner-cutting exercise is failing to meet the requirements of its customers.

Overall, I would highly recommend this glorious looking figure, however, I’d urge you to consider forking out for the S.H. Figuarts version to get the best results. It’s still a great figure, but the flaws highlight the defects in Hasbro’s design.

 

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Phil Roberts is the Owner, Daily Content Manager, and Editor-In-Chief of The Future of the Force. He is passionate about Star Wars, Batman, DC, Marvel, Star Trek, Indiana Jones, Ghostbusters, King Kong, and the Ray Harryhausen movies. Follow him on Twitter @philthecool where he uses the force and babbles frequently!

 

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